Blog

  • Meet the Cast of Ofrenda

    This spring, APTP’s 32 youth ensemble members will premiere Ofrenda, a new play devised by APTP, written by Isaac Gomez and directed by Stephanie Paul and Maggie Popadiak. The 32 cast members, all of whom are co-creators of the devised work, range in age from 13 to 18 and have spent from one to five years as members of the APTP company. Get your tickets now!

  • There’s a Playwright in the Room?!

    We are thrilled to announce that our next original performance, Ofrenda, is being written by Chicago playwright Isaac Gomez and directed by longtime APTP artistic leaders Stephanie Paul and Maggie Popadiak. Ofrenda will be performed by APTP’s largest ever ensemble, 33 teens ranging in age from 13 to 18, all of whom are co-creators on the show. Ofrenda begins performances April 25 at our home theater in Albany Park.

  • APTP Seeks Box Office Coordinator

    Albany Park Theater Project (APTP) seeks to hire a Box Office Coordinator to support the premiere of OFRENDA, a new theater performance created by APTP, one of the country’s preeminent youth theater ensembles. OFRENDA is a constellation of real-life stories about creating home in turbulent times. OFRENDA will be performed by an ensemble of 34 teens in APTP’s 100-seat home theater in one of the most diverse immigrant neighborhoods in the country.

  • Onichino: The Family Feud

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Carl “Raphael” Williams rewrote “Pinocchio.” Read C.R.’s story below:

  • The Story of Rob Hood

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Rodney Clemons rewrote “Robin Hood.” Read Rodney’s story below:

  • Pinocchio

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Darrell Fair rewrote “Pinocchio.” Read Darrell’s story below:

  • Anansi the American Eagle

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Abdul-Malik Muhammad wrote his own “Anansi the Spider” story. Read Malik’s story below:

  • Jack and the Beanstalk

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Willie Moses McGee III rewrote “Jack and the Beanstalk.” Read Willie’s story below:

  • Duckin’ Ugly

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Devon Terrell I rewrote “The Ugly Duckling.” Read Devon’s story below:

  • Sleeping Snow Brown & the Seven Dudes

    During this semester at Stateville, we read different short stories from the collection Tales and Stories for Black Folks edited by Toni Cade Bambara. Within this collection are a variety of rewrites of “classic” fairytales and folktales as well as new interpretations of common African folklore. Students were then asked to rewrite their own tale. We asked questions such as: How would you change the story to tell your own message? What characters would have to change, be omitted, or be added? Who is this story for?

    Henry Lovett rewrote “Sleeping Beauty” and “Snow White and the Seven Dwarves.” Read Henry’s story below: